Rusty Blackbird

Birds at the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury

January 27, 2018

A black-capped chickadee at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A black-capped chickadee at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
An eastern bluebird at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
An eastern bluebird at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A song sparrow at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A song sparrow at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A rusty blackbird at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A rusty blackbird at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A tufted titmouse at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.
A tufted titmouse at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury, photographed by Dan Trippe.

Dan Trippe photographed a black-capped chickadee, an eastern bluebird, a song sparrow, a rusty blackbird, a tufted titmouse, and a cedar waxwing at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge in Sudbury.

Rusty Blackbird Migration Blitz

March 17, 2014

The following request is from MassWildlife. We only have a few reports of rusty blackbirds, including one photo from Greg Dysart, on Nature Sightings over the years, so if you help out, send your sightings our way as well.
CALLING ALL CITIZEN SCIENTISTS: HELP MASSWILDLIFE WITH A RUSTY BLACKBIRD SURVEY
Take Part in the Rusty Blackbird Migration Blitz --This spring, birders across Massachusetts will seek out Rusty Blackbirds and record sightings during their spring migration. It’s easy to get involved! Search for this illusive bird anywhere you like and report your results. The Massachusetts portion of the Blitz runs from March 15 to April 1.
This is a great opportunity for birders to directly contribute to the conservation of an imperiled species. It is estimated that the global population of Rusty Blackbirds has declined by an astounding 85-95% since the mid-1990s. Reasons for this decline are unclear and very little is known about the habitat requirements of this bird during migration. 
Before heading out to the field make sure you can accurately identify a Rusty Blackbird and distinguish it from look-alike birds. Report your efforts and sightings to eBird under the “Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz” survey type. Remember that even if you didn’t see a Rusty, your report telling us that you made the effort is just as important as reports of actual sightings. For birders who would like more guidance, or for anyone willing to collect highly-valuable additional information, see the optional Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz protocol document. This document includes information about how to record and report field observations and outlines the extra data birders can collect (i.e. taking photos, recording information about local habitat, etc). If you have questions, contact the MassWildlife Biologist and MA Rusty Blackbird Blitz Coordinator Drew Vitz.
Reports of “Rusties” in southern states are already coming in. Let’s make sure Massachusetts is well represented during the Blitz!
 

Birds at GMNWR in Concord

October 30, 2010

A Le Conte's sparrow at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Concord.
A grasshopper sparrow at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Concord.
A rusty blackbird at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Concord.
Greg Dysart photographed a Le Conte's sparrow, a grasshopper sparrow and a rusty blackbird at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Concord.

Rusty Blackbird

December 30, 2006

Tom Treadwell saw 10 Rusty Blackbirds along the abandoned rail line during the Christmas Bird Count.