Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle in Wayland

October 13, 2015

A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Mary Jane Sterling.
Mary Jane Sterling photographed this bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland.

Bald Eagles in Wayland

September 20, 2015

Bald eagles at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
Bald eagles at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Russ Place.
Russ Place photographed these bald eagles at Heard Pond in Wayland.

Birds in Wayland

April 5, 2015

Tree swallows at Heard Farm in Wayland, photographed by Lisa Eggleston.
A killdeer at Heard Farm in Wayland, photographed by Lisa Eggleston.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Lisa Eggleston.
Lisa Eggleston photographed a bald eagle at Heard Pond, and a killdeer and tree swallows at Heard Farm in Wayland.

Bald Eagle in Natick

January 14, 2015

A bald eagle in Natick, photographed by Douglas Dow.
An immature bald eagle in Natick, photographed by Douglas Dow.

Nature at Heard Pond in Wayland

October 8, 2014

Fall foliage at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
An immature bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
An American robin at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
Joan Chasan photographed two bald eagles, an American robin and fall foliage at Heard Pond in Wayland.

Bald Eagle and Osprey at Heard Pond in Wayland

September 26, 2014

An osrpey with a fish at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
An osrpey with a fish at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
An osrpey at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
A bald eagle at Heard Pond in Wayland, photographed by Joan Chasan.
Joan Chasan photographed a bald eagle and an osprey at Heard Pond in Wayland.

PRELIMINARY SPRING EAGLE COUNT RESULTS

April 30, 2014

Following up on an earlier request by MassWildlife, for citizens to help out in the annual spring eagle count, MassWidlife has shared preliminary count results, which are below:
"On April 4, 2014, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (DFW) conducted a statewide Spring Eagle Survey. Agency staff and other interested citizen volunteers checked known eagle territories and explored areas with potential eagle habitat to verify continued use of “old” nests and to search for "new" eagle nests. The preliminary results of these efforts yielded a total of 37 active eagle nests throughout the Commonwealth.  These preliminary numbers do not include any birds from the Quabbin where it’s expected there will be a similar number of nesting eagles as there were in 2013 (11 territorial pairs). Ice conditions on Quabbin Reservoir prevented the usual boating survey on April 14 and a later trip was postponed due to high winds. A survey will take place by mid-May. The highest number of active nests (11), were documented along the Massachusetts stretch of the Connecticut River. Four nests were documented along the Merrimack River. Individual nests were located throughout the state, with number of nests in the Berkshires (Lake Buel and Onota Lake), Central Massachusetts (Wachusett Reservoir and Pine Hill Reservoir), and the southeastern section of the state (Assawompsett Pond and Halfway Pond).  A total of 4 new nests were reported this year in Ipswich, Lenox, Northbridge, and Royalston.  
Bald Eagles have increased in numbers in the state ever since they were reintroduced to the Quabbin Reservoir in the 1980s. Andrew Vitz, DFW State Ornithologist expects final results will indicate that a record number of eagles is nesting in Massachusetts.   "With higher numbers of eagles establishing nesting territories throughout their range, we can't possibly cover the entire state." said Vitz. "Citizen spotters play an important role in our survey efforts. We had 30 volunteers actively participate in the count and have received dozens of e-mails this spring reporting eagle sightings. Several of the new nests were first discovered and reported to us by the public.”   
Vitz thanks everyone who participated in this count, especially to Department of Conservation and Recreation for reservoir survey efforts and all the volunteers who dedicated their time to looking for eagles. He encourages anyone to submit eagle sightings during the breeding period (April-August) to MassWildlife’s electronic Vernal Pool and Rare Species VPRS Information System, an online data submittal and mapping application. Sighting reports can also be sent to: [email protected] or by postal mail to "Eagle Survey", DFW, Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program, 100 Hartwell Street, Suite 230, West Boylston, MA 01583."

Nature at Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge

April 9, 2014

Chris Renna recorded this video of nature at the Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge. Featured in the video are bald eagles, eastern red-backed salamanders, turkey vultures and a red squirrel, among others.

Massachusetts Spring Eagle Count

March 17, 2014

The following request is from MassWildlife. We've had many bald eagle sightings in our region over the years and are hopeful our readers can help out in this effort.
Help with Spring Eagle Count in Early April -- Eagle and other wildlife enthusiasts are asked to save April 4, 2014 to participate in the statewide Spring Bald Eagle Survey. This effort will include a concentrated survey of the major rivers, lakes, and reservoirs across the Commonwealth. Organized by MassWildlife, the survey will be conducted by agency staff and volunteers. Teams will be checking known eagle territories and exploring areas with potential eagle habitat to try to locate “new” eagle nests. If inclement weather prevents the survey on April 4, the backup date is April 11, 2014. Additionally, MassWildlife encourages anyone to submit eagle sightings throughout the spring by email to [email protected] or by postal service to “Eagle Survey,” MassWildlife, Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program, 100 Hartwell Street, Suite 230, West Boylston, MA 01583.
This is the second annual Spring Bald Eagle Survey, replacing MassWildlife’s long-standing Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey. “Now that Bald Eagle numbers have greatly increased and have been removed from the Federal Endangered Species List, the need to monitor nationwide populations has been reduced,” said Andrew Vitz, MassWildlife’s State Ornithologist. “At the same time, the number of eagles has increased across the Commonwealth. The Spring Eagle Survey helps us more closely monitor eagle breeding, nesting, and distribution in Massachusetts.”

Eagle and Osprey at Heard Pond

November 1, 2013

A bald eagle at Heard Farm in Wayland, photographed by Judd Nathan.
An osprey at Heard Farm in Wayland, photographed by Judd Nathan.
An osprey at Heard Farm in Wayland, photographed by Judd Nathan.
An osprey at Heard Farm in Wayland, photographed by Judd Nathan.
Judd Nathan photographed a bald eagle and an osprey at Heard Farm in Wayland.

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