Homepage

Impact

Together with our 2800 members and 200 volunteers, we...

  • Conserve and care for over 4300 acres of fields, forests, and farms in the 36 communities surrounding the Assabet, Sudbury, and Concord Rivers.
  • Maintain more than 55 miles of hiking trails.
  • Help friends and neighbors connect with nature through our events, programs, and outings.
  • Assist local organizations in their efforts to protect the region’s most important natural areas.

Join/Donate

Volunteer

Stewardship Projects

Land Protection

Upcoming Programs

Stay Connected

 

Take a Hike

Hamlen Woods, by Joyce Dwyer
Hamlen Woods, by Joyce Dwyer

Please note that Mainstone Farm is privately owned. Portions of the land are not open to the public. Please stay on designated trails, shown on the map.

Hamlen Woods and Mainstone Farm highlight a complex of conserved lands owned by the Town of Wayland, Sudbury Valley Trustees, and other private entitites. Additional protected lands, including Mainstone Hills, Reeves Hill, and Turkey Hill contribute to a network of wildlife habitat and public trails.

Trails are open for passive, public recreation. They are managed cooperatively by SVT and the Town of Wayland.

The trails are marked with colored diamond-shaped signs, indicated by the corresponding colored lines on the map. The blue trail will lead you from the Hamlen Woods parking area, north to Reeves Hill Conservation Land, over a one-way route of approximately 1.75 miles. The red trail will take you on an approximately 4.5 mile circuit through all of the connected areas. Use caution while walking Rice Road if you plan to link your walk between the Mainstone Farm parking area and Turkey Hill Road.

PDF icon Hamlen Woods and Mainstone Farm Trail Map

Nature Sightings

A red fox kit in Lincoln, photographed by Harold McAleer.
A red fox kit in Lincoln, photographed by Harold McAleer.

April 19, 2018

Harold McAleer photographed this red fox kit in Lincoln.

A cotton-tailed rabbit in Framingham, photographed by Steve Forman.
A cotton-tailed rabbit in Framingham, photographed by Steve Forman.

April 16, 2018

Steve Forman photographed this cotton-tailed rabbit in Framingham.

White-tailed Deer in Framingham, photographed by Steve Forman.
White-tailed Deer in Framingham, photographed by Steve Forman.

April 15, 2018

Steve Forman photographed these white-tailed deer in Framingham.

A nest box at Upper Mill Brook in Wayland, photographed by Carole Hohl.
A nest box at Upper Mill Brook in Wayland, photographed by Carole Hohl.

April 13, 2018

Carole Hohl, a Volunteer Preserve Steward and Nest Box Monitor at Upper Mill Brook Conservation Area in Wayland, photographed this nest box that contains a nest and eggs of an eastern bluebird - our first reported eggs of the season. SVT volunteers help to monitor boxes at our reservations to ensure that native species, such as bluebirds or tree swallows, are able to use them. Although pesticides and competition negatively impacted bluebirds in the early and mid-20th century, they have recovered well in recent years and are stable or increasing both as breeding and wintering birds. Much of this recovery is thanks to bluebird boxes that provide nesting locations for the cavity nesters. Monitoring nest boxes alerts us to problems birds may be having with predators and competitors. House sparrows (sometimes called English sparrows) and European starlings are non-native species introduced from Europe. Their aggressive seizure of cavity nest sites is a primary reason for declines in eastern bluebird populations.

A meadow vole in Lincoln, photographed by Harold McAleer.
A meadow vole in Lincoln, photographed by Harold McAleer.

April 5, 2018

Harold McAleer photographed this meadow vole beneath his bird feeder in Lincoln.